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DonelleBeira 06-22-12 09:14 AM

What did you observe?
 
Observation is critical when walking an Earth Path so this thread is a place for us to post the things we see whether they be simple or profound.

Where did your mind go as you watched? What questions came to mind? Did you learn something from the experience?

DrumWolf 06-22-12 09:56 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
My observations are often mundane rather than profound (but still interesting). I perform no rituals or invocations, but a regular Earth Path activity I do is hiking around my area.
Walking over rough terrain is fantastic for focusing the mind, as I have to be aware of every footstep in case I mis-judge a loose rock, don't see a rabbit hole or whatever. Because I'm focused on the ground, I get the chance to see all sorts of bugs, beasties and plants and how the communities change as I hike higher. I would be missing all that if I was just striding unobservantly over the land.

feranaja 06-22-12 10:40 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
nettles and plantain doing very poorly here this year, well plantago major was awful, lanceolata was good. Valerian, motherwort, mallow and mugwort are HUGE. The tree swallows left early; beautiful mourning dove pair here all the time. The oriole came as he did last year but left early, too. I am blessed with three squirrels to dote on this summer, we normally have none. My waxwings here of course. We see no deer at all since the guy with all the dogs moved in across the field; elder very late blooming.
Ground ivy took over so no prunella, which really sucks, since I plan to work deeply with her this year. But the mullein is fantastic - perhaps we get what we need.

and, it's the strangest weather ever.

DonelleBeira 06-27-12 12:08 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Spirals and Branches.....

http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/x...ations/014.jpg

DonelleBeira 06-27-12 12:09 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
A lone doe feeding at midnight three nights in a row......

Brigidrose 06-27-12 12:15 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Cardinals and robins splashing in our bird bath...the baby bunnies hopping around and the puppy coyotes trying to howl in the evening for their gathering.

Brenna 06-28-12 01:00 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Thistles are getting ready to bloom.

DonelleBeira 06-28-12 11:07 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
A male Cardinal passing food to a female Cardinal, who flew away with the morsel dangling from her beak.

feranaja 06-28-12 04:44 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
incredible harvest of sambucus candensis (elder) more than I can use, overflowing -- but no hypericum (St. John's Wort) no prunella ( All heal) and the roses died back so quickly

freezing cold like late autumn and then hot like today...extremes, unusual

Brenna 06-28-12 08:14 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
The bees seem to be after the clover lately.

Windsmith bat Gaia 07-01-12 04:50 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Last week my life was absolutely inundated with fireflies. I took my weekly walk to the Mississippi River, and a little swarm of them was flying in front of me—in the middle of the day! I'd never noticed fireflies doing their thing in daylight before. Two days later, I was cycling home from a friend's house at around sunset, and the path almost the whole way home was alive with those little lights. Amazing.

ffetcher 07-11-12 05:14 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
This could have gone into several different threads here: it's partly 'connecting to nature in a city', but it'll fit here quite nicely.

Camping at the weekend, even if the trip from the tent to the shower block was like the Somme battlefields, brought it home to me how different the morning sounds were. I've posted before about how for me the relationship between birdsong and dawn forms a cycle, so this morning I lay in bed and listened to the sequence (it's still too wet and unpleasant to do any of my favourite walks as meditations):

Blackbirds without juveniles;
High pitched chirrups that I think are coal tits but I'm not sure;
HeliMed-five-six (the engine noise is distinctive, controlled airspace can't be open yet so it's a genuine emergency);
More high pitched chirrups;
Van arriving to unlock the compound for the patient transport ambulances (airspace will now be open);
Blackbirds with juveniles (they must be close to flying the nest now, so we can get the tree lopped before it takes out the 'phone line);
Manchester flight departing (so wind is from the south-west-ish);
Pigeons;
Helimed-five-six departing;
More pigeons;
Final squawks from blackbirds;
Hot water cutting in, so time to get up, make tea and assemble beloved's packed lunch;
Robin on windowsill.

Edit: later, lying in the bath, the sun came out. Just for a few minutes and it's raining again now, but it's astounding how much better I feel all of a sudden.

blessings
ffetcher

Fethenwen 07-12-12 03:42 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
I don't think I've ever observed nature so much as this year, I have been practically observing my eyes out :p

A very interesting journey, starting from early spring. I have been living in three different parts of Finland so I have had the opportunity to compare these places. It's really fantastic to open up ones senses and really tune into the environment.

I have finally started to identify with ease our most common birds and some less common ones. I don't really know the names of these in English but I could name one bird that I noticed last week, I had to take out by binoculars to actually identify this little bugger. Common Rosefinch, not that common at these parts and it makes such cute sounds.


We have had a lot of rain this summer, and the weather has been mostly on the cooler side. We had a few really hot days, and during those the mosquito population exploded. I was practically eaten alive when I was harvesting plantain leaves. And also I have been bitten by a tick and other unidentified bugs. Fortunately my thick bite seems to be uninfected with borrelia, and plantain really took away the rash and itchiness.


I have been harvesting more plants then usual too, I've made the most awesome teas, dried plants for infusions, some oils are on the way, vinegars and tinctures. Plantain is something I have been most acquainted with, it has helped my with my thousand mosquito bites, the tick bite and healed up my belly button piercing. What an awesome and so underestimated plant it is. Most of my harvesting days I have spent in more northern parts around the villages of my moms house, most of the plants had yet to start blooming so I had plenty of time to harvest.


Here in southern Finland I have observed how HUUUGE plants can grow, some taller than a full grown man. I wonder if they are more huge this year than the last. Especially Woolly Burdock is huge, I wonder if it can be used medicinally in the same way as Burdock? It looks very similar, especially the leaves. Burdock as in Arctium Lappa doesn't seem to grow here wild, unless it's some remnant from old plantations. Talking about remnants, the area in and around my home town Turku is very interesting because one can find really peculiar remnants of cultivated plants, trees and bushes. People have been living here since early medieval times.

Yeah, what else is worth of mentioning? Well yesterday I had a wind observation day while I was in the city centre and outside, yes I did now notice the difference on how the wind feels and behaves according to what micro climate I was in. In the city where the buildings rose a little higher, the wind felt quite harsh like blowing through a tunnel, funny how I never took much notice of that before. And when I went through a park that had thick areas of threes and bushes the wind behaved very differently, the feel was mellow and nice almost lulling.

Aah :)

LarkWahya 07-21-12 11:04 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
I took these pics in a small nature preserve near my house last night when my parents and i went for an evening walk
http://i460.photobucket.com/albums/q...0720121905.jpg

http://i460.photobucket.com/albums/q...720121905a.jpg

theres a frog in this one

http://i460.photobucket.com/albums/q...0720121910.jpg

this is a video of a duck eating grass off the bottom in a shallow part of the pond, he looked like he was going to flip over, its not good quality cuz i had to zoom but you can see the shape of him as his back end goes straight up lol. I wish you could see his little feet kick around

http://i460.photobucket.com/albums/q...0720121857.jpg

Windsmith bat Gaia 08-06-12 11:00 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
We're in the middle of having our yard landscaped, and the grass has been smothered with mulch in preparation for a couple hundred native wildflowers. The mulch seems prone to a certain type of mushroom--I don't know what it is, but they're small and gray and every time it rains about a hundred pop up and then disappear by day's end. It's fantastic.

DonelleBeira 12-08-12 06:24 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
The Crow Tree -





http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/x...irffie/004.jpg


http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/x...irffie/001.jpg


The Crow come in every night to roost in this tree then fly off with the morning light.
http://s752.beta.photobucket.com/use...tml?sort=3&o=0

DonelleBeira 12-10-12 12:56 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
This is a Christmas Cactus that my maternal Grandmother grew. My mom started one from a cutting of hers then after many years, got tired of messing with it and threw it out in the yard. I salvaged it. That was about 30 years ago. It has died back and regrown countless times and I am always amazed when it blooms.

The last picture looks like a little Fairy to me. ;)

http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/x...202012/002.jpg

http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/x...202012/003.jpg

David_2010 12-10-12 07:24 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Very cool, the seeker, and the last one does look like a small Fairie.

Windsmith bat Gaia 12-17-12 10:22 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
One thing I love about the leaves falling in Autumn is getting to see how many birds have nested in the trees on my block. This morning on my way to my car, I paused and just took in as many as I could see. Such a wonderful reminder of the vast community we're part of.

DonelleBeira 12-28-12 11:13 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
The winter storm that tore through Arkansas has damaged the Green Wall. :( I have a clear view across what last week was a thick wood into the housing division on the other side of the woods. All the tree height is gone - whether broken, pulled up, or simply bent over from the weight of the snow and ice still present, I can't tell. I can see many snapped trunks standing with the raw trunk cores exposed.

One tree I know is gone, one I called Grandfather Tree because he was so huge at the base and so tall. He looked like three saplings had started growing together then blended into one trunk that split into three again as it gained height. He is gone. :( Grandfather Tree is one I always spoke with when storms were coming and always thanked after it was over. His branches were heavily weighted toward the house yet he fell away from his weight, into the woods and not the house. I couldn't help but cry when I realized he had passed and that he did it in a manner to spare us. He is the second Grandparent Tree to fall since we moved here and both fell away from us when they could have crushed us easily.

The Crow Tree has sustained damage as well but he is still standing, thankfully.

My Soul hurts for all the losses I see, not only around our home but all over yet I am grateful more lives weren't lost.

David_2010 12-28-12 07:53 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by the seeker (Post 290666)
The winter storm that tore through Arkansas has damaged the Green Wall. :( I have a clear view across what last week was a thick wood into the housing division on the other side of the woods. All the tree height is gone - whether broken, pulled up, or simply bent over from the weight of the snow and ice still present, I can't tell. I can see many snapped trunks standing with the raw trunk cores exposed.

One tree I know is gone, one I called Grandfather Tree because he was so huge at the base and so tall. He looked like three saplings had started growing together then blended into one trunk that split into three again as it gained height. He is gone. :( Grandfather Tree is one I always spoke with when storms were coming and always thanked after it was over. His branches were heavily weighted toward the house yet he fell away from his weight, into the woods and not the house. I couldn't help but cry when I realized he had passed and that he did it in a manner to spare us. He is the second Grandparent Tree to fall since we moved here and both fell away from us when they could have crushed us easily.

The Crow Tree has sustained damage as well but he is still standing, thankfully.

My Soul hurts for all the losses I see, not only around our home but all over yet I am grateful more lives weren't lost.

His physical presence may no longer be visible, but, I'm sure, the Grandfather Tree is still around in some form.

I am truly sorry for the devastation that was inflicted, both on the human and non-human world.

Windsmith bat Gaia 01-01-13 11:52 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Holy crap, the squirrels in our neighborhood are so fat! Definitely Winter!

DonelleBeira 03-24-13 11:20 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Last week I had a mild case of the flu and spent most of the time in bed. On the wall opposite the foot of the bed is a double window that looks out on the wooded strip in front of the house. A sapling that survived the winter storms is still standing but leaning at nearly a 20-degree angle toward the East. Each morning as the Sun rose, this leaning sapling would fill with song birds, silently facing East until the light was full in the air. Then as if they all heard the signal, they would burst up in flight as one, singing their little hearts out as they greeted the day. In the evenings as the Sun was setting, the leaning sapling would once again fill with silent song birds but in the days' final moments they would face West. In the last glimmers of light, they would all take flight as one, silent but for the sound of their wings, flying away to their resting spots for the night.

I have made it a point to watch the leaning sapling in the mornings and evenings - the birds always come unless it is storming, always facing toward the Sun, always in silent prayer as they watch Him rise and set.

I feel blessed.

DonelleBeira 05-24-13 09:26 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
This morning I observed a bunny with a bird on its back climbing a tree trunk....then I put my glasses on.

inkdreamer 05-24-13 10:43 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Oh? :p

I watched a ground hog and her baby cross the road. Usually I only see them in the fields. I wondered where they were headed.

DonelleBeira 05-26-14 03:41 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
For the past couple of months I have been interacting with a raccoon whom I have dubbed "Mama". Here are some pics and videos of Mama.

http://s752.photobucket.com/user/gir...?sort=3&page=1


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swaj...eature=mh_lolz

Brigidrose 05-26-14 04:56 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Today a bunny under our deck, their nest is in the wood pile by the fire pit.

CailinRua 05-26-14 05:04 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by DonelleBeira (Post 313186)
For the past couple of months I have been interacting with a raccoon whom I have dubbed "Mama". Here are some pics and videos of Mama.

Thats really cool Donelle!

In my neighborhood deer walk through the streets early in the morning :). Even in the downtown area, I always thought that was really neat. They loved my front yard at my old house and one year they ate the tops of all my plants and the bark off a young walnut tree that i had moved from up against my foundation over to a place it would do much better. It was a bummer, so i appreciate the full fenced back yard i have now that protects the garden hehe.

Lately I've just enjoyed watching the red wing black birds, i love how they sound like "R2D2", they watch me too, as i putter around the yard

feranaja 05-16-18 03:02 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
So far this year... trilliums, red elder and trout lily everywhere...robins, blue jays, chickadees, woodpeckers, the biggest ravens I have ever seen,and owls (Great Horned and Barred). Strawberries all around, and the sumac is coming back now. I have heard a great crested flycatcher in the woods and that gorgeous wood thrush song at night. It's a very different space from my old place, but wilder and filled with magic. I am working on a walking stick, a staff, a rune set, and a wand from fallen beech, paper birch, red oak and hemlock.

Brigidrose 05-16-18 05:33 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
The fragrant lily of the valley, 3 hummingbirds. I put the feeders out 3 weeks ago even if it was chilly and the early arrivals came and sipped.

feranaja 05-16-18 06:20 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Oh - lovely. My hummers are here as well, forgot to mention. They are such a delight, and now almost all my cats are older, they're much more content to watch birds from inside the house. Still have to watch Franklin - but we do our best to keep him in. He's not the world's greatest hunter and more interested in mice, so I let him out mid day for a bit.Otherwise, I intend to feed a wholelotta birds while we're here.

MonSno_LeeDra 05-16-18 10:08 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
It's sort of interesting what passes for routine and what is perhaps interesting or exciting to others. As I walk about my yard I notice but it seems normal or just part of the daily routine for me.

1. The small birds nest in our one tree with it's 4 hatchlings. Each day I see them with their heads sticking up as they look out and about, slowly growing over time since I first saw them a few weeks ago. Yet knowing that soon they shall be gone. Their might actually be five in the nest but it's hard to tell for certain.

2. The wood pile we stacked up a few weeks ago has now become home to one of the skinks. Think he is a blue tail from the few glimpses I've had of him. Not really unusual as we see them around the property fairly often, just a new home.

3. The deer are out and about as normal with the herd I see the most often being around 6 - 10 in size. Most often in the early morning or late evening though there have been some mid morning. Of course no antlers right now so can't tell if they are males or female but likely females.

4. Our Bald Eagles have moved out of their winter nest now so don't see them now. Yet during the winter and early spring not unusual to see them. They nest on the side of the mountain up behind our house so we see them rather frequently. With a telescope or binoculars we can usually see the nest and the hatchlings. They will usually return to the nest around Oct / Nov time frame for breeding.

5. The turkey gaggle has also retreated and moved to their summer pasture. Yet again during the winter and spring months they will be on the mountain behind us. You can hear them all the time and they'll be in the field behind the house. Pretty interesting watching the males strut around and puff up and flare out.

6. There is a small fox population near us and you'll occasionally see them come into the field or edge of the field and forest. Yet they tend to stay higher in the fields and tree's so unless your up in the tree line don't really see them. Yet they feed on the rodent population of ground hogs, rabbits, mice & moles.

7. Right now our fruit tree's are starting to show their fruit, so looks like our tree's will do pretty well this year. The small peach tree (fruit size) has a pretty good yield but may have to cut off one major branch yet that was heavily damaged last year due to weight. The large peach tree (fruit size) is looking good as well though may have to spray to keep the Japanese beetles down. Our pear tree looks good fruit wise this year, last year a late frost killed most of the blossoms so it didn't have much fruit. Two of our three apple tree's may not do to well though as they didn't have many blossoms so that is still a wait and see. Grapes might actually produce something this year though, right now lots of small grape clusters on the vines.

8. Unfortunately still lots of trimming and pruning to do around the yard. Couple of garter snakes in the flower beds and hedges but don't worry about those. What I worry about are the rattlesnakes and copperheads that are found in our area. Have a large black snake that is a resident near our one shed but again that's sort of normal in this area.

9. Speaking of sheds, one of our sheds has a resident ground hog (Hedge Hog) that lives under it. Big old fellow who likes to get out in the yard and eat the clovers and such. He's a sight to watch as he moves through the yard and funny when he takes off running. Kids like to watch him from the house when he's out.

10. Haven't seen any yet but should be seeing the fire flies soon. Those ever popular lighting bugs who light up the night sky during the summer months. We usually have quite a few of them though some years are better than others.

11. Right now only have about 4 humming birds that we can identify at the house. Never really get more than 4 - 8 at any one time though. Yet like to sit on our porch and watch them.

Guess that's enough for now. Like I said to me it's just day to day stuff and I suppose I take a lot of it as a given and for granted. Walk about the yard and check the status of things and see how it's doing or the status on it.

feranaja 05-17-18 09:40 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MonSno_LeeDra (Post 328420)
It's sort of interesting what passes for routine and what is perhaps interesting or exciting to others. As I walk about my yard I notice but it seems normal or just part of the daily routine for me


I love it all, and my happiest times are those days I can slow down and really soak it in....


Quote:

1. The small birds nest in our one tree with it's 4 hatchlings. Each day I see them with their heads sticking up as they look out and about, slowly growing over time since I first saw them a few weeks ago. Yet knowing that soon they shall be gone. Their might actually be five in the nest but it's hard to tell for certain.
What a delight - what kind of birds are they?




Quote:

2. The wood pile we stacked up a few weeks ago has now become home to one of the skinks. Think he is a blue tail from the few glimpses I've had of him. Not really unusual as we see them around the property fairly often, just a new home.
I'm not sure we even have skinks here - I just saw a picture of a blue tail the other day. Very cool little guys....


Quote:

3. The deer are out and about as normal with the herd I see the most often being around 6 - 10 in size. Most often in the early morning or late evening though there have been some mid morning. Of course no antlers right now so can't tell if they are males or female but likely females.
Only fleeting glimpses of white tails here so far, and of course, the poop. I miss my little herd immensely.

Quote:

4. Our Bald Eagles have moved out of their winter nest now so don't see them now. Yet during the winter and early spring not unusual to see them. They nest on the side of the mountain up behind our house so we see them rather frequently. With a telescope or binoculars we can usually see the nest and the hatchlings. They will usually return to the nest around Oct / Nov time frame for breeding.
We see the odd one here, more Goldens though. So cool you can see the nest!!


Quote:

5. The turkey gaggle has also retreated and moved to their summer pasture. Yet again during the winter and spring months they will be on the mountain behind us. You can hear them all the time and they'll be in the field behind the house. Pretty interesting watching the males strut around and puff up and flare out.
It is..and the first time I heard their cry, I thought there was a yeti out there or something. Amazing creatures.







Quote:

6. There is a small fox population near us and you'll occasionally see them come into the field or edge of the field and forest. Yet they tend to stay higher in the fields and tree's so unless your up in the tree line don't really see them. Yet they feed on the rodent population of ground hogs, rabbits, mice & moles.
There have to be foxes here - I see bobcat scat, but no fox signs as yet.


Quote:

7. Right now our fruit tree's are starting to show their fruit, so looks like our tree's will do pretty well this year. The small peach tree (fruit size) has a pretty good yield but may have to cut off one major branch yet that was heavily damaged last year due to weight. The large peach tree (fruit size) is looking good as well though may have to spray to keep the Japanese beetles down. Our pear tree looks good fruit wise this year, last year a late frost killed most of the blossoms so it didn't have much fruit. Two of our three apple tree's may not do to well though as they didn't have many blossoms so that is still a wait and see. Grapes might actually produce something this year though, right now lots of small grape clusters on the vines.
BIG envy. I hope to have some peach trees as well as apple n the land in future. Peach leaf tincture is an amazing remedy, not as well known in herbal circles but powerful stuff. http://www.woodherbs.com/Peach.html

Quote:

8. Unfortunately still lots of trimming and pruning to do around the yard. Couple of garter snakes in the flower beds and hedges but don't worry about those. What I worry about are the rattlesnakes and copperheads that are found in our area. Have a large black snake that is a resident near our one shed but again that's sort of normal in this area.
We are fortunate not to have any venomous snake sin this area; that said, I know of one persn who was bitten quite badly by a large rat snake and became very sick, like hospitalized-sick, with infection. we do have big rat snakes, but they're furtive..Lots and lots of garters and some milk snakes too.


Quote:

9. Speaking of sheds, one of our sheds has a resident ground hog (Hedge Hog) that lives under it. Big old fellow who likes to get out in the yard and eat the clovers and such. He's a sight to watch as he moves through the yard and funny when he takes off running. Kids like to watch him from the house when he's out.
:o What about your dogs? Even at 12 and 13 my big boys would be all over a groundhog!!


Quote:

10. Haven't seen any yet but should be seeing the fire flies soon. Those ever popular lighting bugs who light up the night sky during the summer months. We usually have quite a few of them though some years are better than others.
I was saddened to read about the decline in firefly population. They are always one of the magics of June, for me. http://www.firefly.org/why-are-firef...appearing.html


Quote:

11. Right now only have about 4 humming birds that we can identify at the house. Never really get more than 4 - 8 at any one time though. Yet like to sit on our porch and watch them.
4 individuals or species? I know there are more types down south..we have Ruby-throats and I never tire of watching them, but they can be pretty aggressive.


Quote:

Guess that's enough for now. Like I said to me it's just day to day stuff and I suppose I take a lot of it as a given and for granted. Walk about the yard and check the status of things and see how it's doing or the status on it.
Even on the busiest of days I manage to do that am and pm. We have species here I don't know well - Striped maple, Hop Hornbeam, and a lot of sumac, which I know *about* but have never used, made medicines with..plus a ton of mushrooms, especially reishi on the hemlocks, but many more I don't know. It keeps the kid in us alive to explore nature, and awakens the sacred too when we open to that. Loved reading about your land and creatures. :)

MonSno_LeeDra 05-17-18 11:58 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by feranaja (Post 328424)
I love it all, and my happiest times are those days I can slow down and really soak it in....

I know what you mean. Unfortunately today that "Soaking it in" also means soak it in as it is raining. Still, happened to notice our Elderberry plants are either starting to get their berries already or their bloom pods are starting to form.


Quote:

What a delight - what kind of birds are they?
They look like sparrows of some sort. Ironically we though we had an empty nest on our porch over the light. The wife came in today and said we have at least one chick in that nest as well. Same type of bird but it always flies out when ever we go out the door or turn on the light as it's our main door. So figured it wouldn't amount to anything.


Quote:

I'm not sure we even have skinks here - I just saw a picture of a blue tail the other day. Very cool little guys....
They are interesting lizards for sure. Normally only see one at anytime.


Quote:

Only fleeting glimpses of white tails here so far, and of course, the poop. I miss my little herd immensely.
We know they come into our yard due to the scat they leave. Know for sure we have both males and females due to the scat. We have two yards that they use. One we keep mowed and one we allow to grow up and gets cut for hay. Then later in the year we tend to let our cut yard grow a bit higher as we know they bed down in it at night due to the "beds" we find.

We have a few honey suckle bushes on our property line so they do come down to eat that after it blooms and gets berries on it. Then we also have a small pond on the side property that we use for hay that can't be cut around and they lay in that area as well.

Quote:

We see the odd one here, more Goldens though. So cool you can see the nest!!
Occasionally we'll see Fisher Eagles but that is it other than the Bald Eagles. It is interesting having a nesting pair up behind us. The wildlife services come around every so often to check on the nest and see how it is doing or if they have moved it. A few years ago had a bad storm come through and knock the old one down and they moved their nest for a few years. But now it's pretty much back to the general area the old one was at.


Quote:

It is..and the first time I heard their cry, I thought there was a yeti out there or something. Amazing creatures.
They can make some racket that's for certain. It's interesting seeing them fly. They don't tend to fly to far when they do but they can fly. Will shock you when you see them all up in the tree's and they start squacking.

Quote:

There have to be foxes here - I see bobcat scat, but no fox signs as yet.
I think we have bobcats here as you'll hear that "baby or child" scream at times in the woods. But it's not to often and I believe it's more a situation of we are on the edge of ones territory.

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BIG envy. I hope to have some peach trees as well as apple n the land in future. Peach leaf tincture is an amazing remedy, not as well known in herbal circles but powerful stuff. http://www.woodherbs.com/Peach.html
You know I've never actually gotten into the tincture stuff. That's one aspect of things that has always eluded me, the herbal side of things. My wife has slowly picked up some aspects of it and tried various stuff.

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We are fortunate not to have any venomous snake sin this area; that said, I know of one persn who was bitten quite badly by a large rat snake and became very sick, like hospitalized-sick, with infection. we do have big rat snakes, but they're furtive..Lots and lots of garters and some milk snakes too.
That's one disadvantage of living in the mountain's in general. Lots of wildlife but also the venomous snakes. The rattlers like rocky area's so you sort of know where they will be found. The friggin Copperheads though, they like fields and damp areas so meadows and such can be dangerous. Then factor in the rattler will warn and try to avoid you but the copperhead is a mean snake to begin with and doesn't warn and will strike and come at you.

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:o What about your dogs? Even at 12 and 13 my big boys would be all over a groundhog!!
When we let them run loose they'd take off after the groundhogs. Heck they'd take off after the deer and be gone for hours at a time. So it got to the point we had to have them on a leash to walk our dogs or have them in the fenced in kennel.

Now Sassy, she's the oldest and mother of the 8 year old pups, be pretty much drop leash. She still has the heart to chase but not the energy and just ignore them. Same with the deer, and the cattle in the back field when they are there.

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I was saddened to read about the decline in firefly population. They are always one of the magics of June, for me. http://www.firefly.org/why-are-firef...appearing.html
That was always a memory of my youth as well. It truly was Christmas in June & July with all their colors. I recall Green's and Yellow's that filled the sky and lit the tree's up.

Today its not as grand but where we're at we still get quite a few here. Some nights the tree's still look like Christmas tree's and the air sparkles with them. Especially when the backdrop of the forest seems extra dark which make them stand out even more.


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4 individuals or species? I know there are more types down south..we have Ruby-throats and I never tire of watching them, but they can be pretty aggressive.
On average we tend to see the Ruby Throats and the Emerald Throats the most. Occasionally we'll see a Yellow throat'd variety or a plain grey throat'd variety.

I agree they can be aggressive. We put out 4 or more feeders that are spread some distance apart. It's funny watching as 1 will claim a feeder then not only protect that feeder but drive the others away from the other feeders. A few times we'll have 1 or 2 that will sit on the hanging bars the feeders are held up by and just watch the world go by. Pop up and flutter their wings then land right back down.


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Even on the busiest of days I manage to do that am and pm. We have species here I don't know well - Striped maple, Hop Hornbeam, and a lot of sumac, which I know *about* but have never used, made medicines with..plus a ton of mushrooms, especially reishi on the hemlocks, but many more I don't know. It keeps the kid in us alive to explore nature, and awakens the sacred too when we open to that. Loved reading about your land and creatures. :)
There's still a ton of plants, grasses and things here I don't recognize. That or can't tell you based upon it's seasonal differences based upon bark alone for instance. Some I recognize in high summer but looks to similar to others in early spring.

Its like I find it frustrating when I see a tree for instance and can recognize it from a distance due to its leaves and canopy. Yet when I go into the forest to find it can't recognize it being directly under it. Or reversely, recognize it while under it but can't find it once I get out from under it and see only its canopy.

Habilus 05-17-18 02:04 PM

Re: What did you observe?
 
LIFE.

Windsmith bat Gaia 08-15-18 11:54 AM

Re: What did you observe?
 
Pollinators of all sorts love our monarda. We've had monarch and admiral butterflies, and lots of different kinds of bees. My darling spouse calls bees, especially bumblebees, the "outdoor kitties," and talks to them in the same voice they use for the cats. It's adorable. It's always such a gift to come home at the end of a long day at work and see so much activity in our yard.


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