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Old 04-14-13   #21
petrus4
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Default Re: Stereotyping and Misrepresentation

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I hope by being NDN is not a dis-qualifier for EarthSong Forums. If so one could find him or herself in a not so welcomed and friendly way by posting here.
Nobody is saying that. Fera is the administrator here. If she wills it, then you have as much right to be here as anyone else.
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Old 04-14-13   #22
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Default Re: Stereotyping and Misrepresentation

Perhaps a bit off topic ...but does anyone here have good info on the Caddo and Quapaw? I live in an area that seems to be on the border between these two and want to learn about them.

Edited to add - as far as I know, I am not NA. I have no idea about my heritage.
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Old 04-14-13   #23
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Default Re: Stereotyping and Misrepresentation

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Perhaps a bit off topic ...but does anyone here have good info on the Caddo and Quapaw? I live in an area that seems to be on the border between these two and want to learn about them.

Edited to add - as far as I know, I am not NA. I have no idea about my heritage.
Greetings, the seeker

There’s a good deal of information available regarding these people.

The Quapaw or as they called themselves - Ugákhpa, meaning those living downstream were once part of a larger group living in the Ohio Valley and where that river flowed into the Mississippi which included the Wazhazhe,(Osage) Kanza, and Omaha. For some reason, probably under pressure from migrating Algonquians or raiding Iroquoians sometime in the 14th century these people who spoke an eastern Siouan dialect, disbanded and left their old homeland. Some migrated up the Mississippi, others moved westward while the Ugákhpa, headed southward downstream settling in what is now Arkansas. It has been theorized that these eastern Siouan were part of the Mississippian mound building culture

The Hasínai(Caddo) are a people who once lived in Louisiana, Arkansas and Texas. They are related to the Pawnee, Wichita and Arikara. At times the Caddo were both enemies and friends to the Comanche. Due to minor similarities in languages, some historians and linguists have made claims that Caddoan speaking people such as the Hasínai and Chahiksichahiks(Pawnee) are distantly related to Iroquoian speaking people who include the Haudenosaunee and Tsálagi. In old Pawnee legend the Iroquoians were cousins and once neighbors who eventually migrated northeastward.

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Old 04-14-13   #24
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Default Re: Stereotyping and Misrepresentation

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Nobody is saying that. Fera is the administrator here. If she wills it, then you have as much right to be here as anyone else.
Why petrus4, I have not said anyone has.

Unless you are heralding, I kind of figured out on my own that feranaja is the administrator here.

Let me say it is too bad you have had unpleasant experiences with NDNs, but there could of been the possibility those NDNs have experienced the same in regards to you. Remember there are cultural differences which have an effect on the way we sometimes come across to each other.

Perhaps we can make talk in a good way.
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Old 04-15-13   #25
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Default Re: Stereotyping and Misrepresentation

Thank you, Atehequa. In my research, it seems I live literally on land between the two tribe's territories in Arkansas. This canoe was found in the Saline River which runs through the county I live in, just a few miles from the house.

http://www.angelfire.com/journal/dqueen/canoe.html

In my walks around the county, my mind often wonders how they lived and how they worshiped, what plants they used and for what. Did they fight constantly with each other or were there times they perhaps met on this border in peace. There is a feeling of connectedness, and deep loss, as my feet walk in their steps.
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"Remember these moments always, but do not ignore the sad times, either. Memory is the greatest of gifts."
Spoken by Aditu, a Sithi (an Elf)
from "To Green Angel Tower II"
by Tad Williams
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Old 04-20-13   #26
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Thank you, Atehequa..
No problem, the seeker.

So how do you feel about those or other NDN people being stereotyped and misrepresented?
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Old 04-20-13   #27
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Default Re: Stereotyping and Misrepresentation

I'd love to revive this area of ESF... It would be really neat. I'm very interested in NA gods and goddesses.
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Old 04-21-13   #28
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Do you think there is still much of this attitude among the "assimilated" peoples?
In some respects, it is almost understandable, particularly in the earlier - mid part of the last century. I find myself disgusted by much of what my own people still believe and (worse) do with native traditions. (I even had one person joyfully tell me that they were going to spend a month touring the States "looking" at real Indians... and on their return reported disappointment that they weren't running around wearing feathers and loincloths... *sigh* - Don't ask! We don't see each other so much these days... )
My little contact with native peoples (in various parts of the world) would seem to imply a desire to more fully embrace their lost ancestory, roots and traditions than may have been the case, even 30 or 40 years ago.
Greetings to you, BigAl

Assumptions long held by some white Americans that we all would either become extinct, continue our subjugation in stoic silence, or else become fully assimilated into mainstream American society have thus far proven untrue. We are still here where some of us still affirm our ancient cultures all the while speaking out for justice and more favorable living conditions as the original inhabitants of this land.

Sadly enough some still hold on to those assumptions and many who think of NDNs in a better way, imagine us in a stereotypical manner. I recall visiting one British forum where most of the members thought we all lived like the plains tribes in tipis, riding painted ponies and wearing plains attire. Some of these people actually got put off when I told them different.
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Old 04-21-13   #29
MonSno_LeeDra
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Default Re: Stereotyping and Misrepresentation

From a genealogical aspect one form of NA discrimination and exploitation I often ran across is the person who married an African American but claimed they were Indian as it didn't have the stigma. Then later legends and stories continue the NA implied ancestry where there never was any.

I found that a lot of times people would claim a NA ancestry but the Dawes Rolls would list them as mulatto vice NA with a percentage of blood. Not only the Dawes Rolls but a number of 1900 census in the territories also listed ancestry as Mulatto vice an actual nation or tribal recognization.
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Old 04-21-13   #30
Atehequa

 
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Default Re: Stereotyping and Misrepresentation

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Originally Posted by MonSno_LeeDra View Post
From a genealogical aspect one form of NA discrimination and exploitation I often ran across is the person who married an African American but claimed they were Indian as it didn't have the stigma. Then later legends and stories continue the NA implied ancestry where there never was any.

I found that a lot of times people would claim a NA ancestry but the Dawes Rolls would list them as mulatto vice NA with a percentage of blood. Not only the Dawes Rolls but a number of 1900 census in the territories also listed ancestry as Mulatto vice an actual nation or tribal recognization.
A lot of the eastern woodland people have either Caucasian or African American mixed in with them. My father aside from being part Catawba is said to have had a 'wee bit' of Irish in him as well. The Shawnee along with other eastern woodland tribes early on captured quite a few white people who were adopted just as were runaways from the colonies both black and white. Some Cherokee who by the early 19th century were attempting to live like white Americans, owned African American slaves and mixed it up a bit with them.

One of my grandmothers moved back to Ohio from Oklahoma where she joined some distant kin who remained in the old homeland by buying back bits and pieces of property that no one else wanted. There, away from the rez she was considered 'colored'. Even though she was federally recognized, Jim Crow had an impact on her life. She left there and came to live near us in Virginia. To my knowledge there is still at least one of the Shawnee remnant bands living in Ohio, but they are more or less a heavily mixed people.
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